Louvre Mona Lisa Is The Second Version

The Mona Lisa as it is framed in the Louvre.

Research confirms Da Vinci painted earlier version of his masterpiece. Preeminent scientist and art historian Salvatore Lorusso proves new data changing perception of how Louvre portrait is viewed,

Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of Lisa del Giocondo ‘Mona Lisa’ is the most famous painting in the world. In his new book; ‘Is the Louvre Mona Lisa Leonardo’s second version?’  (L’Erma di Bretschneider – Roma), an in-depth analysis of the original documents, the historical sources and analytical data, Scientist and Art Historian Professor Salvatore Lorusso provides the evidence which settles a long-standing controversial issue: that the artist painted two versions of his immortal masterpiece – the first in c.1503-06 of a young Lisa and the second, the Louvre Mona Lisa, from c.1513 on.

Given the execution of the documented original portrait of Lisa can now be reliably dated, any question of whether it is the Louvre portrait must be considered in the context of the chronology and evolution of Leonardo’s work. Unquestionable evidence shows Leonardo painted two distinct Mona Lisa paintings with different characteristics at different times: the first, an unfinished version and the second, a more finished version, stylistically and structurally different from the first.

Salvatore Lorusso, Professor at University of Bologna

Lorusso’s research takes a critical analysis of numerous publications by Leonardo experts, a small number of whom, despite the evidence, still maintain that the Louvre Mona Lisa was started c.1503 and worked on until near the end of Leonardo’s life in 1519, which is now proven to be an impossibility. 

The historical documents analyzed by Lorusso – many of which have only been discovered recently – show the Louvre Mona Lisa could not have been the original portrait of Lisa del Giocondo started in Florence c. 1503, but instead was likely executed by Leonardo in Rome c.1513-16. Lorusso support this information through an in-depth analysis of the scientific data collected by the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF). Lorusso’s findings prove that the original portrait of Lisa is another version by the great Master, confirming Leonardo painted two Mona Lisas. 

About Salvatore Lorusso

Salvatore Lorusso was formerly a full professor at the University of Bologna, the world’s oldest university, which boasts eminent alumni such as Albrecht Durer, Erasmus, Copernicus, Petrarch, Thomas Becket, Umberto Eco and no less than five popes. With a deep interest in both art and science, Lorusso was among the founders of the first Faculty of Conservation of Cultural Heritage in Italy and is editor-in-chief of the historical-technical Journal ‘Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage’ where the human sciences and experimental sciences meet the arts.

His deep experience and scholarship in both science and art is demonstrated in over 440 publications in national and international journals and 24 independent volumes. His expertise constitutes an ideal blend of both science and art with respect to the complex determination of authenticity and attribution in the field of old masters having recently authored a major publication on exactly that topic. In the last few years, he has become a notable expert on Leonardo’s paintings with specific attention to Mona Lisa and is the author of several works on the subject. His biography appears in the 2016 Marquis Edition of Who’s Who in the World.

Come into the beautiful world of L’Erma di Bretschneider.

Clarins continues to move forward with its CSR strategy, becoming an official member of the UEBT

It all began in Paris on March 15, 1954, when Jacques Courtin-Clarins opened his first Clarins Institute with the pioneering belief that well-being and happiness were inextricably linked to beauty – a daring holistic vision that he was the first to express and apply. At the same time, celebrities were beginning to unveil their bodies on the covers of magazines. The era of physical and mental freedom was dawning – a revolution in which Jacques Courtin-Clarins played an important role by telling women, “Yes, you are beautiful!”.

In France, where skin care has always been paramount, his success was immediate. Word soon spread and Clarins products became available worldwide. Today, Clarins continues to design and produce its products in France and remains faithful to its original philosophy – listening to women (and men!) to truly understand their needs, and developing safe, natural and highly effective skin care products.

Starting with it in 1954, Clarins will always choose a natural ingredient over a chemical one, if it delivers the same level of effectiveness. This is the golden rule that all Clarins researchers follow when designing their innovative new products.

The French Maison uses over 250 natural plant extracts in its formulas. All are carefully selected for their effectiveness and are delivered in an optimal formula to reveal the beauty of every woman and man. Each ingredient is sourced with the utmost care for the environment to protect our planet’s biodiversity.

Clarins is committed to respecting nature and protecting biodiversity. They support local communities and purchase their raw materials in accordance with fair trade principles. They respect current and future generations. As a consumer and a global citizen, they hope that you share their commitment to protecting the environment.

On 10th December 2021, Clarins became an official member of Union for Ethical Biotrade (UEBT). This recognizes our company’s commitment to sourcing that always respects biodiversity and people.

This membership is a step. By accepting us, UEBT recognizes the attention we give to the quality of our sourcing. But above all, it requires us to continually do even more. And luckily we happen to share this goal of continued progress in sourcing that respects people and the planet. There is no approach more coherent with the double promise of Clarins We Care: ‘care for people, care for the planet’.

Virginie Courtin-Clarins, Deputy Managing Director of Clarins Group

Created in 2007, UEBT brings together companies who wish to engage in ethical sourcing of their ingredients of natural origin. Partner of the United Nations Convention for biological diversity, this international NGO promotes best practices and encourages each of its members to do even more in sourcing supplies that respect biodiversity and people. 

Respect of ethical criteria

This initiative of Clarins with UEBT began at the end of 2019. Becoming a member firstly supposes demonstrating that a company like ours respects the ethical criteria of a fair relationship, in particular through the sharing of benefits, a sustainable socio-economic commitment and the preservation of ecosystems.

An action plan to do even more

This required minimum is just a starting point: being a member of UEBT also and above all means being committed to doing even better tomorrow.

To confirm its member status, in 2021 Clarins defined an action plan which will be reviewed every three years. On the agenda are different measures which will ensure continued progress in human and environmental ethics : sustainability and conservation of biodiversity, the fair and equitable sharing of value, the respect of people’s rights and socio-economic sustainability, etc. Our Responsible Sourcing Charter and 2025 commitment to 100% sustainable sourcing are naturally at the heart of our initiative with UEBT.

Always ready to listen, do more and do better. This is the Clarins story.

Come into the beautiful world of Clarins.

Dior presents A.B.C.Dior podcast series, a captivating inside look at the Maison’s codes and icons

French Maison Christian Dior has released a fascinating podcast series called A.B.C.Dior, retracing the destiny of couturier Christian Dior and his Maison from 1947 to the present. In this fun and enchanting primer, each letter of the alphabet introduces a symbol with a wonderful story behind it.

Motivated by a desire to let women rediscover joy, elegance and beauty, French fashion house Dior became synonymous with exquisite fashion and luxury right from its creation in 1947, rapidly growing into a global success.

The audio stories in the A.B.C Dior series explore the life of the couturier, his passions and meetings with charismatic personalities, his childhood in Granville, along with the creative energy and vision of his successors and the exceptional savoir-faire that continues to reinvent the Maison’s timeless codes.

The star, the lily-of-the-valley, the leopard print, Lady Dior, the cannage motif… These symbols of Dior style that have marked the history of fashion are revealed through the Maison’s different universes, from haute couture and perfumes to jewelry. This heritage has been revisited thanks to the creative vision of the Artistic Directors who reinvent it with inimitable Dior audacity, magic and excellence. The podcast episodes are bursting with anecdotes, iconic creations, traditions and  symbols.

The first two episodes of A.B.C.Dior explore the letters M and L: M for muguet, lily-of-the-valley in French, Monsieur Dior’s lucky flower, and L for leopard print an homage to Mizza Bricard, the couturier’s eternal muse.

Don’t miss this captivating journey through time with A.B.C Dior

Shiseido, ahead of its time

Shiseido founder Arinobu Fukuhara recognized the importance and contributions of women from the start. When he built the Western-style pharmacy in 1872, his wife Toku was deeply involved in developing the business, herself studying Western Pharmacology, obtaining a pharmacist license and helping commercialize medicines. 149 years later, women comprise 46.2% of Shiseido’s Board of Directors and Corporate Auditors, with 57.5% female managers shaping the Shiseido Group worldwide.

Come into the beautiful world of Shiseido.